The Sadness by Rodney Howard Browne

Rodney Howard Browne shows us ayers rock

Elijah was a courageous soothsayer, without question . He was also a person of great meekness, as we have seen. But let’s remember that he was simply a man—a human, subject to the condition of being human, as we all are. It isn’t surprising that at that point in Elijah’s life the great soothsayer hit bottom. For many years he had stood powerful amid and against almost impossible percentages and circumstances. But now, after a great victory, he dropped into the throes of discouragement and total despair. Since this is true, we should not be surprised to read that. He was terrified and arose and ran for his life and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there.

I am satisfied this chapter has been included in Scripture. I am happy that when God paints the portraits of His women and men, He paints them warts and all. He doesn’t ignore their defects or hide their disasters.

Elijah had to get his eyes back on the Lord. He’d been used mightily, but it was actually the Lord who made him mighty.

He stood robust against the enemy, but it was actually the Lord who had given him the strength. Regularly we are way more enamored with the gifts God gives us than with the Giver Himself. When the Lord brings rest and refreshment, we become more thankful for the rest and refreshment than for the God who permits it.

When God gives us a good mate, we become soaked up in that fellowship and so engrossed with the mate that we forget all about it was our gracious God who gave us the buddy.